Mandy Lewis is the Founder and President of Albert’s Dog Lounge Rescue in Whitewater. She says she sees firsthand how hard veterinarians work to keep pets safe and healthy. “We have a senior and special needs rescue,” Lewis said. “So, we make them work especially hard with some complex cases. We obviously know that being in animal welfare, there’s always the mental health aspect and always the risk of burnout within our organization and within our vets.” Lewis says no matter the time or day she sees veterinarians going above and beyond to care for her rescues.



MCFARLAND, Wis. (WKOW) — Jobs that involve caring for people or pets can take a toll on the mental health of those professionals.

Mandy Lewis is the Founder and President of Albert’s Dog Lounge Rescue in Whitewater. She says she sees firsthand how hard veterinarians work to keep pets safe and healthy.

“We have a senior and special needs rescue,” Lewis said. “So, we make them work especially hard with some complex cases. We obviously know that being in animal welfare, there’s always the mental health aspect and always the risk of burnout within our organization and within our vets.”

Lewis says no matter the time or day she sees veterinarians going above and beyond to care for her rescues.

There’s been nights that I’ve gotten, you know, phone calls from our beds at 8 pm I’ve watched Maria take some of our dogs home overnight and over weekends,” Lewis said.

“We often just kind of have to keep going until things are done and all the pets that are sick have been taken care of,” Maria Keppel, a veterinarian at McFarland Animal Hospital, said. “Sometimes that means we don’t get home to our families when we were scheduled to do that.”

Keppel says her work is very rewarding, but it can come with major challenges. But surprises like the baked goods Lewis brought on behalf of Albert’s Rescue mean a lot.

“It serves as a reminder of the impact that we have on the community and validates all the efforts that we put into animal care during office hours and after office hours,” Keppel said.

It’s not possible to bring a gift every time you want to thank an animal welfare professional, but staff members at the McFarland Animal Hospital say a thank you and some patience is more than enough.

Supporting us with your understanding and patience makes a lot of difference,” Keppel said. “Just take a minute before reacting or giving negative feedback. Negative feedback is something that we want to hear and need to hear. But having it done in a constructive manner, being patient being kind, those are really just the most important things.”

By fersz